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Vino Client For Mac

12/15/2021
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See below for instructions for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. If you need an RDP application, please search for aRDP in Google Play. In addition, a SPICE client named aSPICE is available.

Parent page: Internet and Networking >> VNC

  1. Provide remote assistance to Windows, Mac and Linux users, or access your Windows (XP and above) and Mac (OS X 10.6 and above) desktops at any time, all from the Chrome browser on virtually any device, including Chromebooks.
  2. It uses “vino” with easily setup steps, and you can get “Vinagre” VNC client on Linux ox, but you need some notices about the access on OSX. So I write my process here. Setup Vino(VNC for gnome) Just reference the post.

Contents

  1. x11vnc
  2. krfb
  3. tightvncserver
  4. TigerVNC

A VNC server is a program that shares a desktop with other computers over the Internet. You will need a VNC server if you want other people to see your desktop. Every VNC server has different strengths and weaknesses and is appropriate for different uses. This page will discuss each of the VNC servers available in Ubuntu, and ways to configure them for most common uses of VNC.

Vino Client For Mac

The most important thing when setting up a VNC server is to only let the right people access your desktop. The safest way to do that is usually to have someone sitting at the desktop deciding who gets to use it, but that's not always practical - for example, if you want to log in to your own computer from somewhere else.

If you want to confirm each connection manually, you should look for these options:

  • Request access each time - pop a window up asking whether to allow each connection as it comes in.

  • view-only access - allow VNC clients to view the destkop, but not to change anything. As well adding a little security, this avoids problems with both of you fighting over control of the mouse.

Using these two options will give you the most security. Requesting access each time will ensure that nobody can connect without you noticing, and view-only access will mean that they can't change anything without asking you to do it for them.

If you want to access your desktop when nobody is sitting at it, these options will be more useful:

  • Only allow local connections - only let people connect if they already have access to your computer.

  • Start your VNC server in 'once' mode - tell your VNC server to allow one connection, then block anything after that.

  • Set a password - require people to send a password before they can connect.

These three options should give you a secure set-up, so long as they're used with port-forwarding. Only allowing local connections means that only people with user accounts on your computer can access your desktop. Starting the server in 'once' mode means that people with user accounts on your computer would have to log in to your desktop between the time you start your VNC server and the time you connect from your VNC client. Setting a password means that, if anyone did try to connect in that brief interval, they probably wouldn't be able to get in before you noticed and stopped the server.

Note: you must set a password if you want to use the in-built VNC client in Mac OS X.

Vino is the default VNC server in Ubuntu to share your existing desktop with other users.

For

To configure vino from within GNOME, go to System > Preferences > Remote Desktop

  • To set vino to request access each time, tick Allow other users to view your desktop in the Remote Desktop configuration window.

  • There's no way to set vino to only listen for the next connection.
  • To set a password, tick Require the user to enter this password:, and enter a hard-to-guess password.

  • To put vino in view-only mode, untick Allow other users to control your desktop.

  • To only allow local connections, open a terminal and run the command:

  • To allow connections from anywhere, open a terminal and run the command:

x11vnc is a VNC server that is not dependent on any one particular graphical environment. Also, it facilitates using in a minimal environment, as it has a tcl/tk based GUI. It can be started while your computer is still showing a login screen.

It is helpful to ensure you have uninstalled any other VNC programs first so that they don't interfere with x11vnc.

As a quick proof of concept to test your connectivity, as per the man page, one may create a password file via:

It will respond with:

One may execute the following in a terminal:

For

Here a few settings that would be common to adjust depending on your environment:

  • To set x11vnc to request access each time when set without a password, include the -nopw -accept popup:0 options.

  • To set x11vnc to only listen for the next connection, include the -once option.

  • To set x11vnc to continually listen for connections, include the -forever option.

  • To put x11vnc in view-only mode, include the -viewonly option.

  • To set x11vnc to only allow local connections, include the -localhost option.

Have x11vnc start automatically via upstart in any environment (<=Utopic)

Have x11vnc start automatically via systemd in any environment (Vivid+)

Have x11vnc automatically start in Kubuntu

One may create a startup script via:

Have x11vnc automatically start in Ubuntu

In Ubuntu (but not Kubuntu or Xubuntu) x11vnc needs superuser access, and needs the -auth /var/lib/gdm/:0.Xauth -display :0 options to be specified on the command-line. The argument value for the -auth option may be found previously with x11vnc -findauth.

Vino Client For Mac

You can run x11vnc before you've logged in by typing something like this:

If you find a blank screen, check the x11vnc FAQ entry on headless servers.

Alternatively, you can add the following lines to the bottom of your /etc/gdm/Init/Default to have x11vnc start after your gnome login does (note that /etc/gdm/Init/Default does not exist on some Ubuntu devices):

Vino Client Mac

Krfb is the default VNC server in Kubuntu. Because it's highly integrated with KDE, running it in other environments is difficult.

To configure krfb, go to System Settings > Sharing > Desktop Sharing > Configure....

  • To set krfb to request access each time, tick Confirm uninvited connections before accepting

  • To set a password, type a hard-to-guess password into the Password input box.

  • To put krfb in view-only mode, untick Allow uninvited connections to control the desktop.

  • There's no built-in way to only allow local connections, although see below for a solution.

Once mode

Krfb doesn't have a built-in way to accept the next connection then stop listening for connection attempts. However, the following Python script will listen for a single connection then exit krfb:

To use this script, open your favorite text editor and paste the contents in. Make sure that the initial '#' character is the very first character in the file, save the file as krfb.py, and set the file's permissions to make it executable. Although this simple program won't open a window of any kind, it will quietly wait for the next VNC client to connect to your computer, then pass the connection through to krfb.

This script will only listen for local connections. To allow connections from anywhere, change 127.0.0.1 to 0.0.0.0 in the script.

Invitations

Krfb lets you create 'invitations', or individual passwords that are deactivated after an hour or after one use. These are a handy way of giving people one-time access to a computer, but only provide limited security. For example, if you send someone an invitation by e-mail or instant messaging, an attacker could read your invitation message as it went over the Internet and use it to log in.

Vino Client For Mac

Invitations can be useful when you want to let other people view your desktop, but you still need to follow the normal precautions when letting other people view your desktop.

Whereas most VNC servers share your desktop, tightvnc creates a completely new desktop, not attached to any actual screen. This makes it much less useful for some things (like remote help), but much more useful for others (like creating a public area for collaboration). If tightvncserver won't start, you might need to uncomment the $fontpath lines in /etc/vnc.conf.

Like x11vnc, tightvnc is designed to be run from the command-line. To start it, type:

Windows Vnc Client For Mac Screen Sharing

This will tell tightvnc to listen for VNC connections on port 5901 from anywhere on the Internet. Without the -nolisten tcp option, tightvnc will also listen for a different type of connection (X11 instead of VNC), which isn't usually very useful. Tightvnc's unusual design means that it can't create a remote desktop on the standard VNC port (5900) if you have an ordinary desktop running on your computer.

  • There's no way to set tightvncserver to request access each time.
  • There's no way to set tightvncserver only to accept the next connection, although see below for a similar solution.
  • Tightvncserver always requires a password, and will ask you to specify one the first time it's run.
  • To set tightvncserver to only allow local connections, include the -localhost option.

Once mode

Tightvncserver can't be set to accept the next connection then stop listening for connection attempts. But it can be set to automatically disconnect each client when the next client connects, and can be stopped after your connection is disconnected. To only allow local connections and automatically disconnect clients, start tightvnc by typing:

Then when your client is disconnected by the next client connecting, type:

Customising your session

By default, tightvncserver provides a session with a simple window manager and a terminal. The first time tightvncserver runs, it creates a ~/.vnc/xstartup file that you can use to customise your session. Here is an example file that would give you a GNOME desktop:

Your changes will take effect the next time you start tightvncserver.

TigerVNC was originally based on the (never-released) VNC 4 branch of TightVNC. It is stable and actively maintained, being around since 2009 and included in most popular distributions. In particular, it supports compositing window managers without requiring a fallback mode, such as with Gnome Shell. When using with the TigerVNC viewer it also uses TLS encryption by default.

TigerVNC is available in Ubuntu 17.04 and newer:

On older Ubuntus, go to https://github.com/TigerVNC/tigervnc/releases to find the latest release, since it is not yet in an apt repository. Download and install:

Its syntax is very similar to tightvncserver, start it as your user with:

And stop it with:

See man vncserver for options. Avaiable options are similar but not identical to tightvnc.

TigerVNC can also replace x11vnc to attach to the local display using the provided x0vncserver binary:

More detailed usage information is available here.

Start TigerVNC vncserver at boot

The ubuntu install package also registers a system service, making it easy to define listening vnc servers on startup. Edit the file /etc/default/vncserver and add the display number and user to start as:

Then enable the service at boot with:

  • GNU Screen and tmux allow you to open, share, disconnect, and later return to text-based terminals.

  • directvnc is a VNC server that shares a Linux framebuffer instead of a desktop.

  • linuxvnc is a VNC server that shares a text-based console instead of a desktop.

  • xrdp is a server for Microsoft's Remote Desktop protocol, a client for which comes with all modern versions of Windows.

  • xserver-xephyr allows you to create a desktop within a desktop on a single computer.

  • Apple Remote Desktop is a desktop sharing application for Mac OS that includes a VNC server.

  • Apple Screen Sharing is a default application in Mac OS X that allows incoming VNC connections.

Having Compiz enabled may interrupt screen updates with some servers and clients. Using -noxdamage with x11vnc can prevent this.

* http://www.karlrunge.com/x11vnc/

This directory contains binaries for a base distribution and packages to run on macOS. Releases for old Mac OS X systems (through Mac OS X 10.5) and PowerPC Macs can be found in the old directory.

Note: Although we take precautions when assembling binaries, please use the normal precautions with downloaded executables.

Package binaries for R versions older than 3.2.0 are only available from the CRAN archive so users of such versions should adjust the CRAN mirror setting (https://cran-archive.r-project.org) accordingly.

R 4.1.1 'Kick Things' released on 2021/08/10

Please check the SHA1 checksum of the downloaded image to ensure that it has not been tampered with or corrupted during the mirroring process. For example type
openssl sha1 R-4.1.1.pkg
in the Terminal application to print the SHA1 checksum for the R-4.1.1.pkg image. On Mac OS X 10.7 and later you can also validate the signature using
pkgutil --check-signature R-4.1.1.pkg

Latest release:

R-4.1.1.pkg (notarized and signed)
SHA1-hash: d0eed7d0755bc80911acb616508d41e1396f810e
(ca. 86MB)
R 4.1.1 binary for macOS 10.13 (High Sierra) and higher, Intel 64-bit build, signed and notarized package.
Contains R 4.1.1 framework, R.app GUI 1.77 in 64-bit for Intel Macs, Tcl/Tk 8.6.6 X11 libraries and Texinfo 6.7. The latter two components are optional and can be ommitted when choosing 'custom install', they are only needed if you want to use the tcltk R package or build package documentation from sources.

Note: the use of X11 (including tcltk) requires XQuartz to be installed since it is no longer part of OS X. Always re-install XQuartz when upgrading your macOS to a new major version.

This release supports Intel Macs, but it is also known to work using Rosetta2 on M1-based Macs. For native Apple silicon arm64 binary see below.

Important: this release uses Xcode 12.4 and GNU Fortran 8.2. If you wish to compile R packages from sources, you may need to download GNU Fortran 8.2 - see the tools directory.

R-4.1.1-arm64.pkg (notarized and signed)
SHA1-hash: e58f4b78f9e4d347a12cc9160ee69d3d23e69f3b
(ca. 87MB)
R 4.1.1 binary for macOS 11 (Big Sur) and higher, Apple silicon arm64 build, signed and notarized package.
Contains R 4.1.1 framework, R.app GUI 1.77 for Apple silicon Macs (M1 and higher), Tcl/Tk 8.6.11 X11 libraries and Texinfo 6.7.
Important: this version does NOT work on older Intel-based Macs.

Note: the use of X11 (including tcltk) requires XQuartz. Always re-install XQuartz when upgrading your macOS to a new major version.

This release uses Xcode 12.4 and experimental GNU Fortran 11 arm64 fork. If you wish to compile R packages from sources, you may need to download GNU Fortran for arm64 from https://mac.R-project.org/libs-arm64. Any external libraries and tools are expected to live in /opt/R/arm64 to not conflict with Intel-based software and this build will not use /usr/local to avoid such conflicts.

NEWS (for Mac GUI)News features and changes in the R.app Mac GUI
Mac-GUI-1.76.tar.gz
SHA1-hash: 304980f3dab7a111534daead997b8df594c60131
Sources for the R.app GUI 1.76 for macOS. This file is only needed if you want to join the development of the GUI (see also Mac-GUI repository), it is not intended for regular users. Read the INSTALL file for further instructions.
Note: Previous R versions for El Capitan can be found in the el-capitan/base directory.

Binaries for legacy OS X systems:

R-3.6.3.nn.pkg (signed)
SHA1-hash: c462c9b1f9b45d778f05b8d9aa25a9123b3557c4
(ca. 77MB)
R 3.6.3 binary for OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) and higher, signed package. Contains R 3.6.3 framework, R.app GUI 1.70 in 64-bit for Intel Macs, Tcl/Tk 8.6.6 X11 libraries and Texinfo 5.2. The latter two components are optional and can be ommitted when choosing 'custom install', they are only needed if you want to use the tcltk R package or build package documentation from sources.
R-3.3.3.pkg
MD5-hash: 893ba010f303e666e19f86e4800f1fbf
SHA1-hash: 5ae71b000b15805f95f38c08c45972d51ce3d027

(ca. 71MB)
R 3.3.3 binary for Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) and higher, signed package. Contains R 3.3.3 framework, R.app GUI 1.69 in 64-bit for Intel Macs, Tcl/Tk 8.6.0 X11 libraries and Texinfo 5.2. The latter two components are optional and can be ommitted when choosing 'custom install', it is only needed if you want to use the tcltk R package or build package documentation from sources.

Note: the use of X11 (including tcltk) requires XQuartz to be installed since it is no longer part of OS X. Always re-install XQuartz when upgrading your OS X to a new major version.

R-3.2.1-snowleopard.pkg
MD5-hash: 58fe9d01314d9cb75ff80ccfb914fd65
SHA1-hash: be6e91db12bac22a324f0cb51c7efa9063ece0d0

(ca. 68MB)
R 3.2.1 legacy binary for Mac OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) - 10.8 (Mountain Lion), signed package. Contains R 3.2.1 framework, R.app GUI 1.66 in 64-bit for Intel Macs.
This package contains the R framework, 64-bit GUI (R.app), Tcl/Tk 8.6.0 X11 libraries and Texinfop 5.2. GNU Fortran is NOT included (needed if you want to compile packages from sources that contain FORTRAN code) please see the tools directory.
NOTE: the binary support for OS X before Mavericks is being phased out, we do not expect further releases!
The new R.app Cocoa GUI has been written by Simon Urbanek and Stefano Iacus with contributions from many developers and translators world-wide, see 'About R' in the GUI.

Subdirectories:

toolsAdditional tools necessary for building R for Mac OS X:
Universal GNU Fortran compiler for Mac OS X (see R for Mac tools page for details).
baseBinaries of R builds for macOS 10.13 or higher (High Sierra), Intel build
contribBinaries of package builds for macOS 10.13 or higher (High Sierra), Intel build
big-sur-arm64Binaries for macOS 11 or higher (Big Sur) for arm64-based Macs (aka Apple silicon such as the M1 chip)
el-capitanBinaries of package builds for OS X 10.11 or higher (El Capitan build)
mavericksBinaries of package builds for Mac OS X 10.9 or higher (Mavericks build)
oldPreviously released R versions for Mac OS X

You may also want to read the R FAQ and R for Mac OS X FAQ. For discussion of Mac-related topics and reporting Mac-specific bugs, please use the R-SIG-Mac mailing list.

Information, tools and most recent daily builds of the R GUI, R-patched and R-devel can be found at http://mac.R-project.org/. Please visit that page especially during beta stages to help us test the macOS binaries before final release!

Package maintainers should visit CRAN check summary page to see whether their package is compatible with the current build of R for macOS.

Binary libraries for dependencies not present here are available from http://mac.R-project.org/libs and corresponding sources at http://mac.R-project.org/src.

Last modified: 2021/05/20, by Simon Urbanek